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Database of USA Gunmakers

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C

C. B.
 Unidentified. Marking on a light, flintlock Kentucky rifle.
C. D.
 Long flintlock Kentucky rifle. Probably Christian Diirr.
C. G.
 Unidentified. Curly maple full-stock, octagonal barrel, flint lock Kentucky rifle. Double set-triggers; cut out patchbox.
C. H.
 Unidentified. Flintlock Kentucky rifle.
C. H. D.
 Marking under barrel breech of a long, flintlock, Kentucky rifle of about 1775-1800. Lock plate marked "T. D."
C. M. H.
 Unidentified. Stamped on barrel of heavy halfstock Plains rifle with brass tube for ramrod socket.
C. N.
 Unidentified. Script initials on barrel of late Kentucky .28 cal. rifle with brass mounted, curly maple full stock and single trigger, back-action lock.
C. P.
Mark of ownership stamped upon arms of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. (Act of March 8, 1797, General Assembly.) Other arms, of earlier production, were ordered stamped “P” surmounted with Liberty Cap while still others (produced at Philadelphia) were ordered stamped with the initial “P”. (Instructions issued Robert Towers, State Gun Factory, on October 27, 1775-)
C. P.
 Letters to denote ownership by Commonwealth of Pennsyl vania.
C. R.
Mark of ownership of arms belonging to the Colony of Rhode Island. “Be it enacted by this General Assembly, and by the authority thereof it is enacted, that, two thousand stand of good fire-arms, with bayonets, iron ramrods, and cartouche boxes, be purchased for the use of the Colony which shall be stamped with the Colony’s Arms and the letters C. R.” (Proceedings of the General Assembly, held for the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantation, at East Greenwich, on the last Monday in February, Anno. Dom. 1776.)
C. W.
 Initials of Charles Williams, U.S. Inspector of Contract Arms, 1808-1814. Inspected arms (sabers) at plant of Nathan Starr.
C. W. H.
 Initials of C. W. Hartwell, U.S. Inspector of Arms within years 1831-1850.
CADMAN, A.
 Columbus, Ga., 1861. Advertised, "Gun and Lock smith, Crawford St., one door west of Rankin's corner near the markets."
CALDERWOOD, William
 Germantown Road, Philadelphia, Pa., 1807-19. Pistol and rifle maker. Contracted on April 21, 1808, with Tench Coxe, Purveyor of Public Supplies, for 60 pair of pistols.
California. Arms Mfg. Co.
544 Market St., San Francisco, Calif. Makers of machine guns, riot guns, gas weapons, harpoon guns, etc. Present day.
CALL, G.
 Pennsylvania in 1780; made early Kentucky flintlock rifles.
CALVERT, James
 McKean, Pa. Emigrated from the Cheviot Hills, Scottish border; died about 1890.
CALVERT, W. H.
 Beloit, Wis. Mostly percussion hunting rifles. Made guns from 1857 until after the Civil War, but operated a sport ing goods shop until 1909.
CAMEL & CO.
 Troy, N. Y., 1840; Kentucky rifles.
CAMP, Ben
 Mt. Pleasant, Pa. Plain, unmarked, percussion hunting rifles. Made his own barrels; used Leman locks.
CAMPBELL
 Gunsmith sent by Federal Government to Ft. Wash ington, Ohio, in 1788.
CAMPBELL, Abner
 Hamilton, Butler Co., Ohio, 1862.
CAMPBELL, Tristram
 St. Louis, Mo., 1842-1860, "journeyman gun smith and gunmaker." Was with Christian Hoffman (Hoffman & Co.) 1842-1855. Percussion walnut stocked rifle with iron mount ings.
CAMPBELL, William
 Annapolis, Md. The Maryland Council of Safety agreed Dec. 11, 1780, to pay him 17 shillings 6 pence, for every musket stocked, finished and delivered.
CANADY, Charles
 Philadelphia, Pa. Listed as gunsmith at 20 Budd, in 1829.
CAPRON, Lyman
 Williamstown, Vt. Before 1875.
CARBOTT, J. A.
 Unlocated. Percussion rifles.
CARDIS, Thomas
 Pennsylvania, flintlock period.
Carey, J.
Ritiemaker. Born in Highland County, Ohio, August, 1826. Established a gun shop in Clinton County in 1850 and active until 1882.
Carey, M.
Riflemaker of Lexington, Ohio, 1857-69.
CAREY, M.
 Lexington, Ohio, 1866-69.
CAREY, Wm. & Co.
 New York, N. Y. Percussion shotgun of fine workmanship.
CARGILL, Benjamin
 Agreed with Elisha Childs and Nathan Frink to make 100 muskets for the Committee of Safety at the cost of $15.00 each, he to procure the stocks.
CARLETON, M. & CO.
 Makers of Carleton under-hammer percus sion pistols about 1860.
CARLISLE, Henry
 Carlisle, Pa. Extra long flintlock Kentucky rifle. 8-lb. percussion Kentucky rifle with 39-inch barrel.
Carondelet
St. Louis, Mo. Produced revolvers prior to Civil War.
CARPENTER, A. B.
 Unlocated. Name stamped on halfstock per cussion rifle with gain twist barrel.
Carpenter, John
Riflemaker of Earl Township, Lancaster County, Penna. Active 1771-90.
CARPENTER, John
 Earl Township, Lancaster Co., Pa., 1771-79.
CARPENTER, Nicholas
 Marietta, Ohio, 1788. First gunsmith to settle in Marietta. Killed by Indians in 1791.
CARR, Samuel
 Gunsmith. Lolar's Court, Phila., Pa., 1819.
CARRINGTON, James
 U. S. Inspector of Contract Arms, 1826-1830. Inspected arms in plants of P. & E. W. Blake and Nathan Starr.
Carroll, Lawrence
Riflemaker of Philadelphia, Penna., 1786-90, before and after. Shop on north side of Spruce St.
Carruth, Adam
Greenville, South Carolina. On November 14, 1816, he agreed to take over the government contract originally held by Elias Earle of the same place. This contract covered 10,coo stand of arms. In 1819 he secured a second contract for 7,750 stand. A report dated January 11th of the year following indicates Carruth had delivered 1,500 muskets receiving $7,500.00. Active 1809-23.
CARRUTH, Adam
 Greenville, S. C, musket maker 1809-21. On Nov. 14, 1816, took over Elias Earle's government contract of Feb. 16, 1816, for 10,000 muskets. Of the contract Carruth delivered only 2,240 stands before Sept. 20, 1820, thereafter failing on his con tract. Also furnished arms to the State of South Carolina.
CARTER, C.
 Fitchburg, Mass. Halfstock percussion rifle.
CARTER, Frank C
 Concord, N. H. Died 1830.
CARTWRIGHT, John
 Ottowah, Ohio, before and after 1865.
CARVER, James W.
 Pawlet, Vt., before and after 1885.
CASE, WILLARD & CO.
 New Hartford, Conn. Makers of underham mer percussion pistols.
Cass, Milo M .
Utica, N. Y. Patented a “repeating, self-capping firearm'’, September 26, 1848.
CASSEL, Lee
 Celina, Ohio; percussion rifles.
CASWELL & DODGE
 Springfield, Mass., musket makers of 1806 1807. Made and offered for sale muskets made on the Charleville (Model 1795) pattern.
CASWELL, E. E.
 Albany, N. Y. Patent breech, percussion, set trig ger, engraved, combination match-hunting rifle.
CASWELL, John M.
 Lansingburgh, Albany, and Lewisburg, N. Y. Son of Thomas Caswell; taught gunsmithing to Nelson Lewis; retired 1836. At 60 State St., Albany, in 1815. Made flintlock Kentucky rifles, 4-shot Ellis-type repeating flintlock pistol, 6-shot flintlock revolver, percussion holster pistol, understriker rifle, percussion Kentucky rifle.
CASWELL, John M., Jr.
 Lansingburgh, N. Y. Son of John M., grand son of Thomas Caswell. Heavy halfstock percussion target rifle with double rest and telescope sight.
CASWELL, Thomas
 Musket maker of Lansingburgh, N. Y., and contractor to N. Y. State for Model 1808 muskets. Established about 1812 with three shops in Lansingburgh, employing about twenty-five workmen. One shop was on State Street (now Second Avenue) and the other two on Hoosick Street (now Thirteenth Avenue). The plants turned out between twenty-five and thirty muskets a week. After Thomas' death, his son John M. Caswell continued the business until 1836.
CAUP, Levi
 West Buffalo, Snyder Co., Pa.
Cave, Christopher
Gunmaker. (Birding Guns) Dock Ward, Philadelphia. Active 1776-80.
CAVE, Christopher
 Dock Ward, Philadelphia, Pa., 1779.
CHACON, Paul
 Concord Street, Baltimore, Md., 1817.
CHAIN, Bill
 Near Scottsdale. Everson area. Pa. percussion period.
Chalkis Mfg. Co.
 Detroit Mich. Adapted an existing plant in 1917 and produced three 3-inc.l1 antiaircraft guns per day in 1918.
Chamberlain Cartridge Co., Chamberlain Cartridge & Target Co.
Cleveland, Ohio. Produced shotgun shells, 1888-93. Added targets in 1894 and active until 1910.
CHAMBERLAIN, E.
 Southridge, Mass. Underhammer percussion pistol.
CHAMBERLAIN, Lyman
 Ellisburg, N. Y.; percussion rifles.
Chambers, Joseph C.
West Middletown, Washington County, Penna. Secured patent on “repeating gunnery”, March 23, 1813. Through the Committee of Defense of Philadelphia, the Navy placed contracts with Tryon & Henry of Philadelphia (Geo. W. Tryon and J. J. Henry), “for 200 muskets and 20 swivels on Mr. Chambers' plan of gunnery” on February 16, 1814. The muskets at S23.00 each, the swivels at Si8.00 per cwt. A second contract was accorded Henry on April 6, 1814, for 100 “repeating pistols on Mr. Chambers’ plan”.
CHAMBERS, Joseph G.
 Contracted with Committee of Defense of Philadelphia, in the War of 1812, to furnish "repeating guns."
CHANDLER, J.
 Unlocated; possibly Highland Co., Ohio. Fullstock Kentucky rifles .34 to .36 caliber with 5-groove barrels marked "J. CHANDLER WARRANTED."
CHANDLER, Stephen
 Musket maker to Committee of Safety, Con necticut, 1776.
CHAPIN, A. H.
 Earlville, N. Y., percussion period.
CHAPIN, E. R.
 Earlville, N. Y., percussion rifles.
CHAPMAN, C
 Unlocated. Confederate arms.
CHAPMAN, C. H.
 Unlocated. Over-under, pill-lock, rifle and shot gun.
Chapman, James
Committee of Safety musket maker of Bucks County, Penna. Active 1770-76, before and after.
CHAPMAN, James
Bucks County, Pa., 1770-76. Musket maker to Committee of Safety.
CHAPMAN, Josiah
 Fredericktown, Md. Operator of a large gun factory during the Revolutionary War.
CHAPPLE, Thomas
 New York City. Percussion sporting rifles.
Charlotte Furnace
Middleborough, Mass. Built in 1758. Produced projectiles during the Revolution and the War of 1812. The shot carried by the “Constitution” in her conflict with the “Guerriere” were cast here. Continued until 1830. (pg. 123, “Iron in All Ages”. Swank.)
CHARLOTTSVILLE RIFLE WORKS
 Charlottsville, N. C. From 1740 through to the Revolutionary War. Established by ex employees of the Lemans of Lancaster, Pa. Made Committee of Safety muskets and pistols.
CHARPIE, P. F.
 Mt. Vernon, Ohio. Cannon-barrel, underhammer percussion pistol.
CHARRIER, Jacques
 60 Market St., Baltimore, Md., 1812. Listed at 35 Water Street in the 1817 Directory.
Chase, Anson
Riflcmaker. At Enfield, Mass., prior to 1830, thence to Hartford, Conn., until 1834 quitting that place for New London, Conn., until 1875.
CHASE, Anson
 Enfield, Mass., before 1830. Hartford, Conn., 1830-34, later New London, Conn.
CHASE, Anson
 44 Bank, New London, Conn., gunsmith, 1870-71.
Chase, William
Riflemaker of Pandora, Ohio, 1854-60.
CHASE, William
 Pandora, Ohio, before and after 1860.
CHATENS, Charles
 Primrose Alley, Baltimore, Md., 1810.
CHERINGTON, A.
 Penna., 1847. Percussion rifle.
CHERINGTON, T. P., Sr.
 Cattawissa, Pa., flintlock period. Father of Thomas P., Jr.
CHERINGTON, Thomas P., Jr.
 Pistol and rifle maker of Cattawissa, Pa., flintlock and percussion periods. Also associated with George Schalk at Pottsville, Pa. Manually operated, early revolving cylinder 7-shot percussion rifle.
Cherrington, Thomas P.
Riflemaker of Cattawissa, Penna., 1847-58.
CHICAGO ARMS CO.
 637-8 Monadnock Building, 1894 Distributors of Protector Palm Pistols, made by Ames Sword Co.
Chicago Fire Arms Co.
Chicago, 111. Listed as manufacturers of “Protector” revolvers, patents of March 6, 1883, and August 29, 1893. May have been dealers only.
CHICHESTER RIFLE CO.
 31 Montgomery St., Jersey City, N. J., 1879. A promotion firm selling mail order revolver-rifles. Closed by action of postal authorities.
CHICOPEE FALLS CO.
 Chicopee Falls, Mass. Percussion cadet musket with back-action lock.
CHILCOTE, J. A.
 Dry Run, Pa., percussion rifle.
CHILCOTE, W. C.
 Pennsylvania percussion rifle maker.
CHILD & PRATT
 St. Louis, Mo., dealers only. A fullstock percus sion rifle made expressly for Child & Pratt by Brown & Tetley Enterprise Gun Works, Pittsburgh, Pa., 1848-62.
CHILD, Elisha
 With Nathan Frink agreed with the Committee of Safety, Connecticut, "for the manufacture of 100 arms, but can get only 50, and those are not yet ready"; January, 1778.
CHILDS, E.
 See Nichols & Childs.
CHIPMAN, Darius
 Rutland, Vt. Musket maker active 1799-1801. In association with Royal Crafts, Thomas Hooker and John Smith contracted under Act of July 5, 1798, for 1,000 Charleville pattern (Model 1795), muskets at $13.40 per stand. Of these 575 were delivered before June 10, 1801. Darius Chipman was born at Salisbury, Conn., in 1758. Was admitted to the Bar in 1781 and was state's attorney in 1785. In 1816 he moved to New York, where he died in 1820.
CHIPMAN, Samuel
 Associated with Thomas Towsey, musket maker, in the contract for 1,000 muskets under Act of July 5, 1798, at $13.40 per stand, of which 275 were delivered by June 10, 1801. Samuel Chipman was the town clerk of Vergennes, Vt., in 1789.
CHITTENDEN, Ebenezer
 Connecticut gunsmith to Committee of Safety. Worked on repair of public arms in 1781. Died in 1783.
CHITTLE, Frederick
 Court Street, Buffalo, N. Y., 1832.
CHNADER, J.
 Unidentified. Kentucky rifles.
CHOATE, N. W.
 Auburn, N. Y., 1850-75. Three-barrel guns. Experi mented with small bore, high speed combination.
CHRISKEY, Lewis
 Philadelphia, Pa., 1815. Probably same as L. Chrisky or Ghriskey, q. v. Flintlock Kentucky rifles.
CHRISKY, L.
 Philadelphia, Pa., Kentucky rifles.
CHRIST
 Lancaster, Pa., 1772. Kentucky rifle.
CHRIST, Albert
 Patentee and maker of Christ 18-shot rim fire cartridge revolver with two circles of chambers and superposed barrels. About 1860.
CHRIST, D.
 Marking on Kentucky barrels, usually bored smooth. Letter "s" is reversed in the die. Probabilities are that Christ was a barrel worker who specialized in smooth-boring worn rifle barrels.
CHRIST, D.
 Lancaster, Pa., Kentucky rifles.
CHRIST, Jacob
 Lancaster Co., Pa., about 1800. Flintlock Kentucky rifles.
CHRISTMAN, J.
 Unlocated. Percussion target rifle, walnut fullstock with forestock projection for muzzle rest.
CHURCH, J.
 Unlocated. Flintlock Kentucky rifle.
Churchill, Josiah
Gunmaker of Belle Plaine, Scott County, Minnesota, 1864-66.
CHURCHILL, Josiah
 Belle Plaine, Scott Co., Minn., 1864-66.
CHURCHILL, Otis
 9 Beaver St., Albany, N. Y., 1839-59. Last listed in 1859 directory at 78 State St. Percussion rifles.

Clabrough & Brother
Gunmakers of San Francisco, Calif., 1870-75.
CLABROUGH & GOLCHER
 630 Montgomery St., San Francisco, Calif. 1887, before and after. Gunmakers. Imported Clabrough & Bro., English shotguns.
CLAGETT, Alexander
 Hagerstown, Md. Musket maker. Contracted for 1,000 muskets Charleville pattern (Model 1795), under Act of July 5, 1798, at $13.40 per stand. Of these 433 were delivered by June 10, 1801.
CLALLCH, H. M.
 Pennsylvania, period of 1780; flintlock Kentucky rifles.
CLAPHAM, Josiah
 Also Clapham Josiah & Co., musket makers 1776-77. Contractors to the State of Virginia.
Clapham, Josiah, Clapham & Co.
Gunsmith contractors to the State of Virginia, 1776-77. A record of payment of £850 for muskets , delivered is noted.
CLARK
 Philadelphia, Pa. Percussion derringers.
CLARK & BLYMYER
 Marking under barrel breech of a full stock Kentucky rifle, probably a percussion conversion from a flint lock.
CLARK & LAMBE
 Anderson Lambe. Deep River, near Jamestown, Guilford Co., N. C. Civil War period, possibly before. Employed 12-15 hands.
CLARK & RANKIN
 Stamping under barrel breech of a Kentucky rifle barrel marked on top flat "C. & J. CRAIG PITTSBURGH." Truitt lock. Possibly Bedford County, Pa. James Clark?
CLARK & SNEIDER
 214 Pratt St., Baltimore, Md., 1876-84.
Clark & Sneider-
Baltimore, Md. Produced Sneider shotguns, 1882-84.
Clark, Alvan
Riflemaker of Cambridge, 1839-41, thence to Boston until 1848 or later. Patented a false muzzle for rifles, April 24, • 1840.(P. O. R. 1856. Pg. 247, “Instructions to Young Marksmen”, John R. Chapman, 1848.)
CLARK, Alvan
 Cambridge, Mass. Patentee of the false muzzle on April 24, 1840. Pat. No. 1565.
CLARK, C. C.
 Percussion pistol.
Clark, Carlos
Riflemaker of Manchester, N. H. Active 1863-75.
CLARK, Carlos C
 Windsor, Vt, 1856-68. Telescopic rifle sights.
Clark, Carlos C.
Riflemaker of Windsor, Vt., 1832-46. Qaimed the invention of the false muzzle which was patented by Alvan Clark in 1840. Carlos Clark claimed to have invented this item in 1836.
CLARK, Charles D.
 Pennsylvania. Kentucky rifles.
CLARK, Ezra
 Hartford Co., Conn., rifle maker employing 19 work ers in 1850.
CLARK, F. H. & CO.
 Memphis, Tenn. Made derringer type percus sion pistols.
CLARK, Frances
 Pennsylvania musket maker to Committee of Safety, 1776. Frances Clark was one of the petitioners, repre senting Pennsylvania gun makers, complaining to the Commit tee of Safety in November, 1776, against the high cost of ma terials and labor entering into arms making, and quoting ad vances in prices within one year, since 1775.
CLARK, H. & CO.
 Memphis, Tenn., makers of an engraved, silver mounted, short handled, percussion derringer.
CLARK, James
 Hopewell Township, Bedford Co., Pa., 1821.
CLARK, James
 Cincinnatti, Ohio, 1807-1831. "Guns, pistols, daggers."
CLARK, John
 Canton, Stark Co., Ohio, 1821-36.
CLARK, Joseph
 Danbury, Conn. Musket maker. Contracted for 500 Charleville pattern (Model 1795), muskets under Act of July 5, 1798, at $13.40 per stand. Of these 325 were delivered by June 10, 1801.
CLARK, Joseph Andre dit
 Detroit, Mich. Had a rifle shop on the southeast corner of Randolph and Lamed Streets. In 1814 was a member of a volunteer company raised by General Gass to drive off Indians who camped too close to town and stole cattle. The Detroit city map lists the property as the "Old Clark Claim."
CLARK, L.
 Unlocated. Halfstock percussion rifles.
CLARK, N.
 Pennsylvania, percussion period.
CLARK, N.
 Curly maple, brass mounted, full stock, octagon barrel, percussion Kentucky rifle.
CLARK, R.
 Albany, N. Y., percussion period.
CLARK, S.
 Lancaster Co., Pa., 1810-1830. Flintlock Kentucky rifle.
CLARK, T. H.
 Lafayette, Iowa. Half stock, double set triggers, per cussion rifle with iron furniture. Barrel marked "T. H. CLARK LAFAYETTE IOWA GAINTWIST."
CLARK, W.
 Unlocated. Full maple stock percussion rifle with patch-box.
Clark, William
Gunmaker of Philadelphia, Pa., 1783-90.
CLARK, William
 Philadelphia, Pa., 1783.
Clarke, John
Originally of Wirt & Clarke of near Richmond, Va. Cannon founders to the U. S. Secured the following contracts: March 15, 1815, 12, 18, 24, 32, 42-pounder carronades, from $58.75 to $200.00 each. August 15, 1818, 100 p-pounders at $60.00; 60 24-pounders (howitzers) at $75.00. The subsequent contracts were secured by Clark who had evidently taken over the firm. July11,1825,8324-pounderironcannon, July30,1827,6024-pounderironcannon. May14,1828,6032-pounderironcannon. March16,1829,7032-poundcrironcannon. July1,1830,6432-pounderironcannon. April13,1831,4832-pounderironcannon, all of the above were contracted for at $5*94 per cwt.
CLARKE, John
 Columbia, Pa., flintlock period.
CLARKE, N.
 Columbia, Pa. 1830-1869. Flintlock and percussion rifles.
CLARKE, R. S.
 Unlocated. Brass barrel flintlock holster pistol. (Possibly English. Uncertain.)
CLASPILL, George W.
 Lancaster, Fairfield Co., Ohio, 1831-1850.
CLAUSE, Nathan
 Pennsylvania. Early maker of flintlock Kentucky rifles, fine craftsman; handsome over-under flintlock rifle-shotgun.
Clement & Hawkes Mfg. Ca.
Northampton, Mass., established 1866, capital $100,000. Produced bayonets and ordnance material, 1866-78.
CLEMENT ARMS CO.
 Nickel-plated .22, "Baby Bulldog" revolver.
CLEMENT, John W.
 Tennessee, pre-Civil War. Heavy percussion match rifles.
CLEMENT, W. T.
 Associated with S. Norris in the manufacture of Civil War rifle muskets marked "S.N. & W.T.C. FOR MASS."
CLEVELAND, W. H.
 Norwalk, Ohio, 1882-83.
CLEWFLIN, W.
 Unlocated. Kentucky rifles.
CLINE, C
 See Kline C.
CLING
 Spring Run, Pa.
Clippinger, Joseph
Riflemaker of New Carlisle, Clark County, Ohio. Active 1846-54.
CLOSSON, Charles
 Phila., Pa. Listed as gunsmith at 6 York Court, in 1829.
CLOUSE, George
 Woodbury Township, Bedford Co., Pa., 1855.
CLOUSE, Henry
 Broadtop Township, Bedford Co., Pa., in 1852.
CLOUSE, Valentine
 "Felty" Clouse. South Woodbury Township, Bedford Co., Pa., 1875. Died about 1927.
CLOWE, Henry W.
 Superintendent Harpers Ferry Armory, 1857.
CLUTZ, Capt. J.
 Massillon, Ohio, 1850-60. Halfstock, percussion target rifle.
COATES, James
 Philadelphia, Pa., 1810-14. Ex-employee of J. J. Henry.
Coats, Moses
Cutler of East Calm, Chester County, Penna. Active 1781-90. . Produced belt axes and belt knives.
CoaU, James
Musket maker of Philadelphia, 1810-14. At one time an employee of J. J. Henry working upon public arms.
COBB, Nathan & Henry
 Norwich, Conn. Musket makers. Contrac tors under Act of July 5, 1798, for 200 Charleville pattern (Model 1795), muskets. All 200 delivered by June 10, 1801.
COCHRAN, John W.
 New York, N. Y., percussion period. "Coch ran's many chambered and non-recoil" firearms, called "turret repeating arms." Mostly made by C. B. Allen.
Cochran, John Webster
Born Enfield, N. H., May 16, 1814. Patented a “many chambered firearm” April 29, 1837. Secured a second patent May 8, 1837, on a “many chambered cylinder firearm”. Bishop states “In 1836 Cochran’s rifles were finished at a factory at Springfield at the rate of 8 per week”. Cochran had previously (October 22, 1834) invented a revolving breech-loading camion. Not being kindly received at home, Cochran took his model to Europe and after some effort gained the attention of the Sultan of Turkey. According to Cochran he constructed a 12-pound brass, breech-loader at the Imperial Arsenal at Constantinople in 1835. From the same source we learn that this piece was fired 100 times with “entire satisfaction”. During the period 1839-47 Cochran spent the greater portion of his time in France. He held many European patents. After returning to the United States he devoted most of his time to the improvement of projectiles and was active until 1861. (Improvements in Ordnance, Firearms and Projectiles, Cochran, New York, i860. Pg. 269, Voi. XI, National Cyclopaedia of American Biography, White, N. Y., 1929.)
COCKERAL, G. W.
 Unlocated. Half stock percussion Kentucky rifle marked on barrel and lock. All engraved silver mountings.
COCKLER, P.
 Lewisburg, Pa. Late percussion period Plains rifle.
COCKLIN, Nicholas
 24 Catherine St., New York, N. Y. 1834-39.
Coes-Lo ring & Co.r Inc.
Worcester, Mass. Produced steel gun forgings from establishment 1888 until 1912.
COESTEL, (?) C.
 Unlocated. Indistinct stamping inside percussion hammers of converted flintlock shotgun by H. Turner, Albany; exquisite custom conversion work.
Cofer, T. W.
At Portsmouth, Va., he produced a limited number of revolvers for the Confederate government which are now very rare. Probably produced less than one hundred. After the Civil War he established at Norfolk, Virginia, where he was active until 1875 or later.
COFER, Thomas W.
 Portsmouth, Va., 1861. Maker of a brass frame, sheath trigger Confederate revolver patented in Richmond Aug. 12, 1861. Operated on a small scale employing less than a dozen hands. Shop was closed with the capture of Norfolk, across the river, by Union forces.
Coffers, Augustus
Riflemaker, North Queen St., Lancaster, Penna., 1848-57, before and after.
 COFFERS, Augustus
 Lancaster, Pa., 1857.
COGSWELL, S.
 Albany, N. Y., musket maker. Established about 1813 in the manufacture of Model 1808 muskets.
COGSWELL, S.
 Troy, Pa., about 1800.
COLBURN, D. G.
 Inventor of revolver, patented June 29, 1833.
COLBY, C. D.
 St. Peter, Nocolett Co., Minn., 1864-71. Associated with Frazer. See Frazer & Colby.
Coldren, Samuel
Rifle barrel maker, North Queen St., near Lemon, Lancaster, Penna., before and after 1857.
COLDREN, Samuel
 Lancaster, Pa., 1857.
COLE, C. W.
 Unlocated. Marking on a heavy sporting rifle.
COLEMAN, Charles
 About 1862. Maker of Coleman breech-loading rifle.
COLEMAN, H.
 Boston, Mass., before and after 1847.
COLIMAN, J.
 Cedar Falls, Iowa, 1866-68.
COLLIER, Elisha
 Boston, Mass., 1807-1812. Inventor, patentee and maker of the Collier 5-shot revolving flintlock pistol, manu factured largely in England, whither he moved about 1813, and where the arm was patented in 1818.
Collier, Elisha H.
A skilled gunsmith of Boston, 1807-12, thence to London. England, 1813, and returning to Boston about 1850. About 1811 he had invented a flintlock revolver which was not kindly received due to the growing popularity of percussion type arms. In this arm the chambers of the cylinders were slightly belied at the mouth to fit over the tapered breech end of the barrel. This insured the axis of the chamber being true with that of the barrel. When seated it was held in place by a spring.
Collins & Company
Established 1828 at Collinsville, Connecticut, by Samuel W. Collins. Active to date at Hartford and producing as fine a line of cutlery as is known. Produced swords and bayonets for the government during the war periods and their machetes enjoy a world-wide reputation for excellence. Of such renown was the Collins brand that Reeves of Birmingham, England, forged “Collins & Co., Hartford” to blades of his production. Collins brought action in the English Courts to .prevent this practice and won, 1856. (Pgs. 122-147, “Great Industries of the United States”, Burr & Hyde, Hartford, 1873. Pg. 522, Vol. I, “History of the Manufactures of the United States” Clark, New York, 1929.)
COLLINS, Lindsey
 Unlocated; probably Indiana. Reported maker of curly maple, fullstock percussion Kentucky rifle, DST, with brass furniture and factory lock.
COLLMAN, J.
 Freeport, 111. Halfstock percussion target rifle with name and location stamped on barrel; DST; factory lock by Spies. Reported used by member of Buffalo Bill's meat supply crew for railroad construction through Hays, Kansas. Possibly identical with J. Coliman, Idaho Falls, Iowa, 1866-68.
COLSON, D. H.
 Eaton, N. Y. Underhammer, percussion pistol.
Colt Patent Fire Arms Co*, Samuel Colt
Samuel Colt, born Hartford, Connecticut, July 10, 1814, died January, 1862. Secured his first patent February 25, 1836, production beginning the same year. The original company, located at Paterson, N. J., failed in 1841 and closed out their assets the following year. With the assistance of the government, Colt reestablished at Whitneyville in 1847, quit- ting that place for Hartford in 1848. The company was incorporated in 1855 and from 1853 until 1864 operated a branch in London. England.  A partial list of early government contracts and purchases fob low: +March 2, 1841, 100 repeating carbines at $45.00+ July 23, 1841, 60 repeating carbines45.00 +August 28, 1845, 100 repeating carbines +August 28, 1845, 100 boarding pistols'...+January 4, 1847, 200 patent repeating pistols 28.00 (open purchase) +January 8, 1849, 1000 revolving pistols. +February 4, 1850, 1000 revolving pistols+ June 27, 1850, 1000 revolving pistols+May 8, 1851, 2500 revolving pistols+May 26, 1853, 1000 revolving pistols+ January 15, 1855, 1000 belt pistols 24.00 +August , 1855, 1050 belt pistols  24.00 December 6, 1855, 100 belt pistols 24.00 +February 13, 1856, 1197 pistols 24.00 +January 7, 1857, 501 belt pistols  24.00 +November 21, 1857, 501 belt pistols.24.00+November 21, 1857, 101 rifles  50.00 + November 21, 1857, 10000 bail cartridges November 21, 1857, 1476 belt pistols+November 21, 1857, 5000 belt pistols+November 21, 1857, 300 rifles 42.50+April 3-October 4, 1858, 6968 rifles 42.50 +April 3-October 4, 1858, 924 carbine pistols  +April 3-October 4, 1858, 80 rifles 50.00 per pair +April 3-October 4, 1858, 187400 ass’ted cVg +March 15-Sept. 14, 1859, 288 rifles.... +March 15-Sept. 14, 1859, 62 carbines. . +March 15-Sept. 14, 1859, 2 carbines.... +March 15-Sept. 14, 1859, no holster +pistols  +March 15-Sept. 14, 1859, 4 pr. holster pistols with shoulder accouterments at 50.00 per pair. During the World War substantial contracts were secured from the Russian government for Vickers machine guns, and by November 11, 1918* the firm had delivered to the United States: 800 n-mm. Vicker machine guns. 12000 Heavy Vicker machine guns. 1000 Aircraft Vickers machine guns. 9000 Browning Automatic rifles.During the World War substantial contracts were secured from the Russian government for Vickers machine guns, and by November 11, 1918* the firm had delivered to the United States: 800 n-mm. Vicker machine guns. 12000 Heavy Vicker machine guns. 1000 Aircraft Vickers machine guns. 9000 Browning Automatic rifles.
COLT PATENT FIREARMS CO.
 Hartford, Conn. The first company organized by Samuel Colt for the manufacture of repeating fire arms under the Colt patent of Feb. 25, 1836, was the Patent Arms Mfg. Co., located at Paterson, N. J. The firm was active from 1836-42, when the company failed due to lack of public and government support and sales, the patents reverting to Samuel Colt. The Mexican War created a demand for arms and obtaining a government contract for 1,000 army revolvers (Model 1847) Colt had them manufactured by Eli Whitney at Whitneyville, Conn. Upon receipt of additional contracts in 1847, Colt estab lished the plants of the Colt Patent Fire Arms Mfg. Co., at its present location in Hartford, Conn. The manufacture of the early dragoons was followed by subsequent government contracts con tinuing to the present day and too numerous to mention here, the firm having supplied the government with all types of arms in peace and wars. It may be of historical interest, however, to mention that according to the firm's records, during the Civil War the Colt Armory furnished the Union forces with 386,417 revolvers, about 7,000 revolving rifles and carbines, and 113,980 muzzle-loading rifle muskets.
COLT, Samuel
 Inventor and manufacturer of the Colt revolver. Born Hartford, Conn., July 10, 1814; died Jan. 10, 1862. See Colt Patent Fire Arms Co.
COLTON, W. M.
 Leominster, Mass. Halfstock percussion rifle.
COLUMBIA ARMORY
 Columbia, S. C, also known as McPhail's Armory. Established with machinery and equipment removed from the Asheville Armory at Asheville, N. C. The plant was located in a warehouse owned by Fred W. Green, on the south side of Gervais Street, opposite Gist, and probably produced muzzle-loading rifles, though it was said to have made breech loaders "just like the Yankees had." The plant was operated as a unit of the Confederate arsenal located a few blocks away, which had been removed from Charleston, S. C, and was in charge of Major J. T. Trezevant, C. S., formerly of Memphis, Tenn. On Sherman's approach, the machinery was packed up and taken to the railroad depot but could not be removed for lack of cars. The armory was shelled by Federal batteries on Feb. 15, 1865, and destroyed. A Federal report by Lt. McCahill showed the capture of 10,410 stands of arms and 6,000 unfinished arms at Columbia, S. C, in February, 1865.
COLUMBUS FIRE ARMS MANUF. CO.
 Columbus, Ga. Established by Louis and Elias Haiman, swordmakers and equipment manu facturers in the plant of the Muscogee Iron Works at the north east corner of 14th and Oglethorpe Streets, which works they had purchased April 1st, 1862. On Aug. 26, 1862, the firm con tracted with the Confederate States for 10,000 navy pistols, $50,000.00 being advanced by the Confederacy on the contract. The plant employed some 385 hands in all departments, and had produced between 300 and 500, round barrel, iron frame revolvers of the Colt navy type, before the plant and machinery were destroyed by General Wilson's cavalrymen in a raid on Columbus. Louis Haiman, born at Colmar, Prussia, came to United States as a child with his family, who settled in Columbus. At the outbreak of the Civil War, Haiman, a tinsmith, opened a sword factory next to Dr. Ware's Drug Store, and with the purchase of the Muscogee Iron Works, expanded his facilities to include the manufacture of bayonets, saddlery, mess equipment, etc After the Civil War, the Haimans, under the name of Phoenix Foundry & Machine Shop, and later the Southern Agricultural Works, engaged in the manufacture of agricultural and mill machinery..
COLVIN, M. S.
 Salamanca and Syracuse, N. Y., before and after 1872. Fine percussion shotguns and target rifles with accessories.
COMINS, Loren
 114 Washington St. and 73 Davis St., San Francisco, Calif., 1856. Lived with and related to P. B. Comins.
COMINS, Paschal B.
 125 Commercial St., San Francisco, Calif., 1852 53. 70 Front St., 1854, and 69 Jackson St., 1858-61.
COMPTON, Phineas M.
 Berlin, Somerset Co., Pa. Gunsmith and tinner. Born June 1, 1804, near Brunswick, N. J. Grandparents came from France. Father came to Berlin in 1813. Reared in Salisbury (Elk Lick), Pa. Died July 4, 1858.
COMPTON, Samuel
 Son of Phineas. Entered his father's shop at age of 13. Died Nov. 27, 1902.
Conant, Hezekiah
“Of Hartford, Conn., formerly of Worcester, Mass., patented a breech-loading rifle which is reported sold for $80,000, S August, 1856/ ’ Patent of April 1, 1856, No. 14554. (pg. 146, Vol. XII, New England Historical & Genealogical Register.)
CONDO
 Milesburg, Pa.; flintlock Kentucky rifles.
CONDRY, W. P.
 Portsmouth, Va. Back-action lock percussion rifle.
CONE, Alfred Marion
 Born in Panama, N. Y., Dec. 21, 1831; died April 1, 1903. A cooper by trade, took up gunsmithing at Co lumbus, Pa.; later on North Centre St., Corry, Pa., and 331 Penn sylvania Ave. West, Warren, Pa. Made very accurate, finely engraved hunting and match rifles, some side-hammers.
CONE, D. D.
 Washington, D. C, 1864-67. Inventor of a cartridge revolver under his name. Probably manufactured by Sharps and Hankins.
CONE, R. M.
 Corry, Pa. Percussion rifle.
CONESTOGA RIFLE WORKS
 Trademark of Henry E. Leman, Lan caster, Pa., 1834-1887; used on inferior or flawed products. Mark ing reported on flintlock and percussion Kentucky rifles, rifle locks, trap gun.
CONFEDERATE STATES ARMORY
 Columbus, Ga. (next to Grant's factory). Arms as well as artillery harness, ordnance materiel and infantry accoutrements are believed to have been made and repaired at this armory, established with machinery removed from Baton Rouge, La., in spring of 1862 as well as from De mopolis, Ala., in 1864 and Atlanta, Ga., when threatened by Sher man. The armory operations were under Major F. C. Humphrey, C.A.S. Ord. Dept., who had been a lieutenant in charge of the Federal Arsenal at Augusta, Ga., and resigned his commission at the outbreak of the war. A contemporary letter states that "Jeff Davis has stopped the manufacture of arms at Columbus, Ga., for if they whip Grant they would have all the guns they wanted, and if they didn't, they would want no more made there." Though the manufacture of arms may have been dis continued towards the end of the war, other ordnance activities continued for on Feb. 21, 1865, Gen. Gorgas placed the C. S. Armory at Columbus (as well as those of Macon, Ga., Athens, Ga., and Tallassee, Ala.) under jurisdiction of Col. James H. Burton, C.S. Ord. Dept., with directive that "all orders for the officer in immediate charge of the Columbus Armory must pass thro' Col. M. H. Wright."
CONKLE, F.
 Unlocated. Probably southwestern Pa. Percussion rifle with James Bown & Son lock.
CONKLIN, H. M.
 Unlocated. Percussion rifle with lock by G. Goulcher.
Connecticut Arms & Mfg. Co,
Naubuc and Glastonbury, Conn. Established 1863, capital $300,000. Produced Hammond rifles and active until 1869 or later.
CONNECTICUT ARMS & MFG. CO.
 Naubuc, Conn., 1866-68. Ham mond carbines and Hammond Bull Dog pistols. See also Welch, W. W.
Connecticut Arms Co.
Norfolk, Conn. Established 1864, capital $11,- 000. Produced pocket revolvers, active 1869 or later. (N. E. B. D. 1868.)
CONNECTICUT ARMS CO.
 Norfolk, Conn. About 1864. Made a .28 caliber front loading, cartridge revolver.
CONRAD, Sam
 Gunsmith, Berlin, Somerset Co., Pa., 1837. Plain rifles of good workmanship.
CONRAD, T.
 Barrel marking of a slim, early percussion period Kentucky rifle.
CONSTABLE, R.
 Phila., Pa. Listed as gunsmith at 88 S. 2nd St., in 1829.
Constable, Richard
Rifle and pistol maker of Philadelphia, Penna. Active 1838-43.
CONSTABLE, Richard
 88 S. 2nd St., Philadelphia, Pa., 1817-51. Gunmaker. Flintlock and later percussion duelling pistols and derringers. Also imported many arms from England.
CONTER
 Unlocated. Walnut full-stock, octagonal barrel, percussion Kentucky rifle.
Continental Arms Co.
Norwich, Conn. Produced cartridge pepperbox, patented August 28, 1866. Active 1866-67.
CONTINENTAL ARMS CO.
 Norwich, Conn., 1866-67. Manufactured Converse 5-shot cartridge pepperboxes.
CONVERSE, William H.
 Colorado Springs, Col., 1875-80.
COOK
 Rhode Island, flintlock period.
COOK & BRO.
 New Orleans 1861-62, Athens, Ga., 1863-64. Makers of Confederate rifles, carbines, and military equipment. The firm was organized by Ferdinand W. C. Cook, engineer and architect, and his brother Francis, in June 1861, with plant at Novelty Works No. 1, Canal Street, New Orleans, La. Operations began with 27 men, with expected output of eight to ten rifles per day. By August 1861 two shifts of workmen were employed. April 25, 1862, on approach of the Federal fleet, the machinery was loaded on S.S. NEWSBOY and left for Vicksburg, thence across country to Selma, Ala., and then to Athens, Ga. At Athens the firm acquired Hodgson's Grist Mill with 24 acres, purchased 249 adjoining acres and erected a stone-and-brick armory with cas tellated walls and flanking towers. The scant machinery brought from New Orleans was supplemented by boring and rifling machinery, drill presses, shapers, milling and other machines made by Athens Foundry & Machine Works. The plant employed a force of about 500 men producing rifles of Enfield pattern, artil lery musketoons, cavalry carbines, triangular bayonets, bayonet scabbards and cartridge belts and boxes. Attempt was also made to manufacture sabers "crude affairs with an iron hilt of Revo lutionary War type." Colonel James H. Burton of Confederate Ordnance, on a visit to the Armory in April 1864, stated that it was the best fitted and operated armory he had inspected in the Confederate States. . "600 rifles and carbines were manufactured last month." Towards the end of the War manpower shortage being critical, the Cook Armory as well as the Athens Foundry & Machine Works were closed down and their personnel formed into a home defence force under Major Ferdinand Cook. The unit participated at the battle of Griswoldsville, near Macon, in June 1864. In Dec. 1864 Major Cook was shot through the head and killed at Goose Pond, near Hardeeville, S. C. In January 1865 the plant was valued at $425,000 including land and buildings. After the War, Francis Cook, as a British subject, managed to obtain a pardon and retain the property which was sold to various foundries and shops, the land and buildings being purchased by Athens Mfg. Co., and converted into a cotton mill.
Cook Brothers, Cook & Bro.
Gunmakers and cannon founders to the Confederate.government. New Orleans prior to 1863, thence to Athens, Georgia, 1863-66 and after. (“Ordnance of the Confederacy^, Gorgas, Army Ordnance Journal, Vol. XXI, Nos. 94-95-)?
COOK, Ashabell
 Clayton, N. Y. Ten-pound percussion hunting and target rifle.
COOK, E. W.
 Lockport, N. Y., 1849. Percussion rifles.
COOK, F. W. C.
 Engineer and gunsmith, Calliope, between Benton and Hercules, New Orleans, La., 1853. (Of Cook & Bros., Con federate armorers?)
COOK, Roswell F.
 West Potsdam, N. Y.; over-under percussion rifles.
COOKE, Jacob
 Also Cook. Contractor Dec. 9, 1807, with Tench Coxe, Purveyor of Public Supplies, for 25 pair of pistols at $10.00 the pair. On Feb. 1, 1808 was given an additional contract for 50 pairs of pistols.
Cookson, John
Gunsmith of Boston, Mass., 1701-62. Enrolled in the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company in 1701. From 1722 to 1726 he acted as company clerk for that organization. In 1727 he was; employed in cleaning and repairing the arms belonging to the Province of Massachusetts Bay. Under date of April 12 and April 26, 1756, the following advertisement appeared in the Boston Gazette: “Made by John Cookson, and to be sold at his house in Boston: a handy gun of 9 pound and a half weight; having a place convenient to hold nine bullets and a powder for nine charges and nine primings; the said gun will fire 9 times distinctly, as quick or - slow as you please, with one turn with the handle of the said gun, it doth charge the gun with powder and bullet: and doth both . ' prime and shut the pan, and cock the gun. All of these motions are performed immediately at once, by one turn with the said handle. Note, there is nothing put into the muzzle of the gun as we charge other guns.” Cookson died in 1762. According to the terms of his will his gunsmith tools were left his grandson Samuel Cookson, his smith's shop to John, brother of Samuel. (From the research of Mr. Charles D. Cook, with permission.)
COOKSON, John
 Boston, Mass., active 1727-62. Inventor and maker of the famous Cookson repeating flintlock arms.
COOLEY, D.
 Unlocated. Kentucky rifles, before 1800. Fine work manship.
COON, D.
 Ithaca, N. Y., son of Levi Coon. Percussion sporting rifles.
COON, Levi (Sr.)
 Ithaca, N. Y., 1821. Flintlock Kentucky rifles.
COON, Levi, Jr.
 Ithaca, N. Y. Son of Levi Coon. Percussion sport ing rifles.
COON, S.
 Unidentified. Percussion alarm pistol patented Sept. 22, 1857.
COONS
 Unidentified. Maker of early American shotguns.
COONS, E.
 Philadelphia, Pa., Kentucky rifles.
COONS, Joseph
 Philadelphia, Pa., after 1810.
COOPER
 Philadelphia, Pa., 1805.
COOPER & HEWITT
 Trenton, N. J. Arms makers to the govern ment during the Civil War.
COOPER FIREARMS CO.
 Located at Pittsburgh, Pa., about 1852 1860, and at Frankford, Philadelphia, Pa., 1860-1869. Made per cussion revolvers at both places.
Cooper Iron Works
Near Cartersville, Bartow County, Georgia. Cannon foundry to the Confederate government, 1862-65.
Cooper, Henry T#
Riflemaker of New York City, 1845.
COOPER, Henry T.
 New York City, before and after 1845. Percus sion pistols. "H. T. Cooper" is marked on the lock of a percussion match rifle by A. C. Stevens.
COOPER, J.
 Flint, gooseneck hammer, lock with roller frizzen spring bearing, on a Kentucky rifle stamped "J. FORDNEY LANCASTER." Possibly connected with English firm B. & J. Cooper, 19 Partition St., New York City in post-Revolution period.
COOPER, J. M.
 Pittsburgh, Pa. Percussion locks on W. McCullough over-under rifle. Same as James Maslin Cooper Firearms Co.?
Cooper, J. M., Cooper Firearms Mfg. Co.
Cooper was active at Pittsburgh, from 1848 or before to 1859 thence (o Philadelphia where the Cooper Firearms Mfg. Co. was organized the same year. Cooper secured five patents, 1851-63, produced Gatling Guns 1865- 66, and one of the very few American double-action revolvers in service during the Civil War. Active until 1866. (Pgs. 944-50, “Great Industries of the U. S.” Burr & Hyde, 1873.)
Cooper, J. R.
Shotgun maker of New York City, 1849.
COOPER, J. R.
 New York, N. Y., before and after 1849. Probably agent for British arms.
COOPER, James Maslin
 Patentee and manufacturer of the Cooper revolver. See Cooper Firearms Co.
COOPER, R. F.
 West Potsdam, N. Y. Percussion over-and-under rifles.
COOPER, Walter
 Bozeman, Montana. Reported in 1892 as a "prac tical rifle manufacturer." Gunsight inventor. Went west in 1858 and for 18 years was almost constantly in camp. Established sporting-goods house at Bozeman in 1869.
Copake Forge
Near Copake, Dutchess County, N. Y. Built 1851. Produced gun iron prior to the Civil War and cannon and gun barrels through that conflict. (Pg. T49, “Iron Manufacturers Guide”, Lesley, New York, 1859.)
COPE, Jacob
 Unlocated. Kentucky rifles.
COPELAND, T.
 Worcester, Mass., about 1860. Revolvers.
CORMAN. H.
 Unlocated. A 24-lb. percussion match rifle stamped "H. CORMAN on 48" barrel and "H. CORMAN for F. BAKER" on silver cheekpiece inlay. Iron mounted, curly maple halfstock, Leman bar lock.
CORNS, Abraham
 Lancaster, Pa., 1857.
Cornwall Furnace
Furnace Creek, Lebanon County, Penna. Built 1742. Produced cannon and projectiles during the Revolution and War of 1812. Active until 1882. (Pgs. 182-183, Swank.)
Cosmopolitan Arms Co.
Hamilton, Ohio. Patent wras granted Edwin Gwyn and A. C. Campbell, October 21, 1862, upon a breechloading arm which later became known as the Cosmopolitan. Production began immediately and later the Union and Gross were taken on also. The government purchased 9342 arms from this firm paying $199,838.29, period 1863-65.
COSMOPOLITAN ARMS CO.
 Hamilton, Ohio. Civil War Cosmo politan carbines, and Gross Patent Arms. See Gwyn & Campbell.
Coster, Abraham
Gunsmith of Philadelphia, 1810-14. Worked for the Committee of Defense, War of 1812, on repairs. Doubtful as to complete arms.
COSTER, Abram
 Philadelphia, Pa. 1810-14. Gunsmith to Committee of Defence.
COTTON, W. M.
 Leominster, Mass. Half stock percussion rifle with octagon barrel marked "W. M. COTTON LEOMINSTER MASS." Lock by Wm. Reid, Boston.
COUCH, John D.
 Middlesex Co., Conn., pistol maker employing three workmen in 1860. That year's output 800 pistols. (Re volvers? )
COULANOY, J.
 Armorer. Was paid $1,280, New Emission Currency (at rate of exchange four for one, equal to $320, specie) for cleaning and repairing 160 muskets and bayonets at Phila., June 13, 1781.
COULTHARD, J.
 Natchez, Miss. Halfstock percussion rifle.
Coutty, Samuel
Gunsmith of Philadelphia, 1783-91. Employed by the commonwealth as a repairman. Doubtful as to complete production.
COUTTY, Samuel
 Philadelphia, Pa., pistol maker, paid tax in Chest nut Ward in 1779. Listed in the City Directories from 1785 to 1794, as residing at 25 Spruce St., in '85, 82 Chestnut St., in '91, 87 Front St., in '93, and 41 So. Water St., in '94. Made arms for private sale and worked on public arms for Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Cowdrey, Machine Works, C. H.
21 Summer St., Fitchburg, Mass. Established 1875 to dale. From 1918 to date produce 37-mm. semi-automatics for infantry and tanks.
Cowell, Ebenezer
First noted as a Committee of Safety musket maker at Allentown, Pa., 1775. His name appears on the tax lists of Northampton County, 1777-78, then upon supply tax return of the city of Philadelphia, 1779-82, with property valued at $17,000. Commissioned to establish a Stale Arms Factory at Allentown he proceeded with this undertaking in October of 1777. However he met with some difficulty in securing the cooperation of Colonel Dishier, Sub-Lieut, of the county, which seriously affected production. This condition was corrected by the Board of War in the Spring following and Cowell continued in tin’s connection until November, 1779. The records of David Rittcnhouse, the Commonwealth Treasurer, indicate that Cowell received £ 10,788:18 for his services from June, 1778, to November, 1779, inclusive. (Pg. 159, 2nd Series, Vol. Ill, Penna. Archives, Papers Relating to the War of the Revolution.)
COWELL, Ebenezer
 Allentown, Pa., musket maker to Committee of Safety in 1775. Made and repaired arms at the State Gun Fac tory in 1778. Later located at Philadelphia, 1779-82. Was paid $280, New Emission Currency (at rate of exchange four for one, equal to $72, specie) for cleaning and repairing 60 rampart muskets at Phila., June 25, 1781.
Cowell, Joseph
Gunsmith of Boston, Mass., 1745.
COWELL, Joseph
 Boston, Mass., 1745.
COWELL, P.
 Pennsylvania, prior to 1783.
COWLES & SMITH
 Chicopee, Mass., 1868. Pistol manufacturers.
Cowles & Smith, Cowles & Son
Chicopee, Mass. First noted as pistol manufacturers. 1866-70. About 1871 Cowles & Smith were dissolved and Cowles & Son took over to continue until 1876 or later.
COWLES, W. W. DEANE & CO.
 Chicopee, Mass. Single-shot, .22 cal. rim-fire cartridge pistols.
COX & SON
 Atlanta, Ga., 1847.
COX, George
 Mifflin County, Pa., late percussion period.
COX, Martin
 Gunsmith. Oak above Noble (N.L.), Phila, Pa., 1819.
COX, R. C. GUN CO.
 Milwaukee, Wis. 1894-95. Gunmakers at 326 Grove.
COXE, Tench
 Purveyor of Public Supplies 1803-1812. Negotiated arms contracts until 1812.
CRABB, Thomas
 Frederick Town, Md. Musket maker, 1799-1801. Associate of Nicholas White, Jacob Metzger and Christopher Barnhizzle in a contract under Act of July 5. 1798, for 1,000 Charleville pattern (Model 1795), muskets at $13.40 per stand, of which 235 were delivered by June 10, 1801.
CRABTREE, Absalom
 Buffalo Creek, Tenn., later migrated to Mc Cracken Co., Ky. Flintlock Kentucky rifles.

CRAFT, George W.
 Craft Creek, Morris Township, Washington Co., Pa. About 1860-1875. Had served apprenticeship under Abe Wil liams. Made unmarked, half stock percussion rifles.
CRAFT, P. W.
 Columbia, S. C, maker of percussion duelling pistols and of a half stock, percussion Kentucky rifle.
CRAFTS, Royal
 Rutland, Vt. Musket maker, active 1799-1801. In association with Darius Chipman, Thomas Hooker and John Smith, contracted under Act of July 5, 1798, for 1,000 muskets Charleville pattern (Model 1795) at $13.40 per stand, of which 575 were delivered before June 10, 1801.
CRAIG, Andrew
 Richland County, Ohio. Prior to 1812, with his brother David, had been gunsmith to the Indians in the "Indian Country." In the War of 1812 they were at stockade and fort at Mansfield.
CRAIG, C. & J.
 Pittsburgh, Pa. Top flat marking of an original percussion Kentucky rifle with barrel marked under breech "CLARK & RANKIN." Truitt lock.
CRAIG, David
 See Craig, Andrew.
CRAIG, J.
 Philadelphia, Pa. Fullstock percussion Kentucky rifle. (Probably J. Craig of C. & J. Craig.)
CRAIG, J. W.
 Unlocated. Percussion sporting rifle.
Craig, Robert
Produced gunlocks for the Committee of Safety at Philadelphia, 1775-76.
CRAIG, Robert
 Philadelphia, Pa. Gun-lock maker to Committee of Safety 1775-76.
CRAIG, William
 Pittsburgh and Alleghany, Pa., about 1850.
CRAMER, Phillip
 Pennsylvania, period of 1820; flintlock Kentucky rifles.
Cramps Ordinance Works
The William Cramps & Sons Ship & Engine Co., dates from 1830, when Cramps' Shipyard was established. It appears that the production of ordnance began in 1890 for that year the firm is listed as manufacturers of Driggs-Schroeder breech-loading rapid-fire cannon. (Seeger & Guernsey, Cyclopaedia of Manufacturers & Products of the U. S., New York, 1890.) Continued ordnance until 1894. Prior to 1912 the firm had built 35 warcraft for the United States, including the “Wyoming” and “Arkansas,” two for Japan, six for Russia, one for Turkey, and two for Cuba.
CRANDALL, Jos.
 Unlocated. Percussion period.
CRANDALL, Marion F.
 Towanda, N. Y., late flintlock and early percussion rifles.
CRAVALTY & DUGAN
 Maryland, Committee of Safety.
 CRAWFORD, Alexander
 Lock filer at Springfield Armory. Filed the first musket lock in 1795 in 3 days labor.
CREAMER, B.
 Phila., Pa. Flintlock Kentucky rifles and flintlock duelling pistols.
CREEDMORE ARMORY
 Miles City, Mont. See A. D. McAusland.
Crescent Fire Arms Co.
Norwich, Conn. Produced single and double shotguns from about 1892 to dare. About 1893 the H. & D. Folsom Arms Company secured control which they exercised for about forty years. In 1930 a merger was effected with the Davis-Warncr Arms Corp. to become the Crescent-Davis Arms Corp. The business was taken over by Stevens Arms Company in 1932.
CRESCENT FIRE ARMS CO.
 Norwich, Conn. Modern.
CRISSEY, Elias
 Hooversville, Pa. 1835-1915. Lightweight flintlock squirrel rifles. Had been apprenticed to Samuel Border in 1854.
CROCKETT, Thomas
 Bath Co., Ky.; came from Virginia. Working in 1800. Made rifles for Gen. Harrison's troops in the Indian wars.
CROFT, P. W.
 Columbia, S. C. Percussion duelling pistols.
CROMWELL, Levi
 265 Ann St., Baltimore, Md., 1860.
CROMWELL, Oliver
 118 Thames St, Baltimore, Md, 1860.
CRONER
 Cross Creek Village, Washington Co, Pa.
CROSBY, C
 Massachusetts, 1867. Half-stock, percussion rifles.
CROSBY, J.
 Springfield Armory lockmaker, 1807-1818. Name stamped inside some Springfield Armory goose-neck hammer pistols dated 1818. Also lock on Springfield musket dated 1818.
CROSBY, L.
 Unlocated. Possibly N.Y.S. Flintlock Kentucky rifle.
CROSMAN ARMS CO.
 903 Monroe Ave, Rochester, N. Y. Crosman air rifles. Modern.
CROSSLAND, I. M.
 Kentucky rifle barrel marked "I. M. CROSS LAND" and dated "1865."
CROSSLAND, John
 Uniontown, Pa. Made Bedford Co, style rifles.
CROSSLAY, J. M.
 Uniontown, Pa. Percussion rifle.
CROW, C. A.
 Lima, Ohio, before and after 1870.
CROYSDALE, Thomas
 Bond Street, Baltimore, Md, 1810.
CRUM, D.
 Unlocated. Percussion Kentucky rifle. Same as Crumm?
CRUM, T.
 Unlocated. Early Kentucky flintlock rifle, Roman nose butt, name acid-etched on barrel.
CRUMM
 Huntingdon County, Pa., late percussion period.
CRYTH, John
 Lancaster, Pa., Kentucky rifles.
CULLEN, T.
 87 Battery, San Francisco, Calif., 1859-60.
CULLMAN, G.
 Cleveland, Ohio, 1840.
Cullmann, Charles
Gun, pistol and rifle maker of Columbus, Ohio. First mentioned as of the year 1850. In 1874 appointed superintendent of the Shooting Grounds on Nursery Lane. Active until 1894.
CULLMANN, Charles
 Columbus, Ohio, shotgun, rifle and pistol maker. Active about 1850 to 1894.
CULLOUGHM, William
 Brookville, Pa. Halfstock percussion rifle.
CUMMINGS & LANE
 Worcester, Mass., 1869-71.
CUMMINGS, Charles A.
 Worcester, Mass., 1866-69. Later Cum mings & Lane.
Cummings, Charles A.,. Cummings & Lane
Worcester, Mass. Cummings active 1866 or before, until 1869. Cummings & Lane, 1869-71.
Cummings, O. S.
Lowell, Mass. Produced 7-shot .22 revolvers like the Smith & Wesson.
CUMMINGS, O. S.
 Lowell, Mass. Top-up .22 revolver.
CUMMINGS, William
 Phila., Pa. Listed as gunsmith at 45 Green, in 1829.
CUNKLE, George
 Percussion period.
CUNKLE, L. G.
 Unlocated. Revolutionary period. Early flintlock Kentucky pistol with hand-forged lock, name stamped on barrel.
CUNNINGHAM, John
 Harford County, Md. Musket maker to Com mittee of Safety. With Isaac Thomas, agreed, March 4, 1776, "for making a parcel of musquets which they oblige themselves to do, agreeably to directions which they have and are to re ceive from the Committee, as may be directed by the Council of Safety, at the price of Musquets are made for at Baltimore, to be complete with steel ramrod and bayonet ..." A company of riflemen was raised in Harford County during the War of Revolution.
Cunningham, W. A.
Riflemaker of Mt. Vernon, Ohio. Active 1852-60.
CUNNINGHAM, W. A.
 Mt. Vernon, Ohio, 1857-59.
Cuoneberger, A.
Riflemaker of Bucyrus, Ohio. Active 1848-34, before and after.
CURRY, C. & CO.
 San Francisco, Calif., 1852-1863. Succeeded by sons J. and N. Curry in 1863 as N. Curry & Bro. or N. Curry & Co. Agents for Colt, Remington, Deringer, and British arms.
CURRY, N.
 San Francisco, Cal. Maker of an all metal derringer type percussion pistol and a cartridge revolver. See C. Curry & Co.
CURTIS, Jesse
 Waterbury, Conn. Musket maker to Committee of Safety. Received payment for sixteen muskets with bayonets, June 15, 1778. Later furnished seven more. On Jan. 22, 1779, in association with Thomas Fancher was paid for twenty-six muskets with bayonets.
CURTIS, Russell
 Arms stoker, Springfield Armory, 1818.
Cushing, A, B.
Riflemaker of Troy, N, Y., about 1840-70.
CUSHING, A. B.
 Troy, N. Y. About 1840-70.
CUSHING, Alvin D.
 Troy, N. Y., 1829-1834. Kentucky rifles. Probably related to A. B. Cushing.
CUTCHALL, I. W.
 Unlocated. Percussion Kentucky rifle.
Cyphers, M. B,
Gunmaker of Skowhegan, Maine, 1859-68.
CYPHERS, M. B.
 Skowhegan, Maine, 1866-69.


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